Friday, April 29, 2005

The journey begins

We are all converging on Toronto.
Laurence and I leave in a few short hours to drive up.
Rebecca and Chris left at 5am Tucson time.
Julee has been there since Wednesday
Gene left this AM to go by Amtrak (good god I can't believe our tax dollars subsidize that route)

The ports and distance:
Port n miles
Toronto to NY 471
Oswego 125
rome 69
amsterdam 77
waterford 39
kingston 69
peekskill 70
New York 22
471

New York to DC 457
New York
Cape May 160
Baltimore 137
Solomans 80
DC 80
457

And here's a short list of some of the stuff we have cramed in a completely full small UHaul:
Wire
3 sleeping bags, 2 pillows, one comforter
High 8 digital camcorder & charger
cassette to laptop adaptor
3 laptops
2 webcams
Hub and 5 runs
extension cords etc.
Shackler & knives
pump for dinghy
dinghy
dinghy outboard
electrical bag (CAT5, Regular crimp tool, DMM etc)
spare laptop
borrow extra camcorder from office
pick up camera from lisa's
print out boat form and model release forms
Put new impellers on engine (2) and check filters
flashlight
Dive tank
Dive computer
First aid crash kit
Emergency pump
My bag of foul weather gear
Scott’s hand held vhf
My spare flares
Scott’s bag of foul weather gear
Dive bag, w/ weight belt, bc etc.
* Box wrenches of the correct type to bleed the injectors
* Socket sets to take off impellers
* Screwdrivers and nut drivers to remove hose clamps
* Vise grips
* Very large pipe wrench might also be handy if I understand the style of construction used on the boat correctly
* 2.5 pound crew persuassion device (hammer)
* Spare fuel filters, primary and secondary
* Spare impellers for both genset and main
New batteries
Jackline
DVDs

Sunday, March 06, 2005

Sunday am 36-05

Tom and I have spent a couple of hours with (most of) the charts and come up with a reasonable itinerary. All dependant on conditions and weather of course! In the meantime, I've been working on the survey, logistics, customs, and so on. It's a month to survey, and two months to delivery, but the time could pass very quickly.

Sunday, February 13, 2005

Toronto

I am guessing that I will want to go up a few days before and get fully checked out on the boat before we leave. I'll get to sample some of Toronto's night life. I love the city. :-)

One of our members has a house right next to the canal in upstate NY, that will be fun.

Going through the locks and the low bridges on the Erie Canal will also be a real hoot. I am going to figure out how to get an HD camera so that I can film the whole trip! Whoo hoo!

Rough destination ports mapped out, schedule refined

Ok, we mapped out the rough ports of call and refined the departure date a bit.

Because it looks like the canal won't open until May 1st, it looks like the crew will go up
on Friday April 29th. We'll leave Toronto first thing Sat am the 30th.
We will clear customs on sunday the 1st and then enter the first lock.

It supposed to be very beautiful and scenic. It might still snow then!

Here are the ports of call:
Day Destination port
0 Toronto (Cross lake Ontario, 100 mile day)
1 S Oswego (Clear customs)
2 S rome (Stop by Mike's)
3 M amsterdam
4 T catskill
5 W peekskill
6 R New York (Crew change?)

Total distance about 450 miles.

Saturday, February 12, 2005

The Erie canal

Ok so my initial calculations are that it's about 450 miles from Toronto to New York city.

Found the link to the canal
www.eriecanal.org

Wednesday, February 09, 2005

Interesting link

Here is a link to another boat's log of some segments of the same trip. Initial estimates are 1 week from toronto to NYC, and then maybe 2-4 days to DC depending on how fast we want to push. Where my last trip was off shore, this one is going to be very much about Canada and the various canals and rivers etc. We will be stoping overnight and won't have to run so many watches. It should be a very relaxed trip. I need that.


http://www.cruising.ca/erie/docs/7e.html

Boat specs

Length overall: 65
Built in 1940 by Russel Brothers, Owen Sound, Ontario
Originally a "steam" tug and converted to diesel in the 1960's
Gross tonnage: 54.95
Net tonnage: 30.21
Shell plating thickness: 5/8", Framing 3" x 1/2", Bulkheads 1/4"
Headroom: Wheelhouse - 6'6", Cabin - 6'6", Engine room - 7', Galley - 6'10". Lower cabin - 7'2", Forward cabin - 6'10"
Detroit Diesel 6-71 c/w Allison 3:1 gear. Engine was rebuilt in 1990
Propeller: 3 blade bronze, RH, 48"
Steering: manual
Fuel capacity: 500 gal
Fuel consumption: 3 1/2 gal per hour
Cruising speed: 8 knots
Safety Equipment: 18 lifejackets, two 24" life rings, 6 fire extinguishers
Bilge Pumps: 110V, 12 VDC on deck gas
Gas fire/deck wash/bilge pump
Furnace: oil forced air
Other Equipment
TV/VCR, Sony AM/FM CD Radio, 32VDC battery charger, 12VDC battery charger, 110V AC power take off (not installed), Honda generator
20 hp Nissan outboard, safe, wood burning stove. 12V battery (for pilothouse equipment
propane BBQ, welder, assorted ship's tools, one 200 gal holding tank
three 200 gal fuel tanks, boat hook, 42" RH spare propeller, emergency tiller, 250' of 1/2" anchor chain, 800 lb anchor, 150 lb anchor, 2 - search lights
All charts from Ontario throu to Florida
Shower in engine room
Last dry docking in 1997 - hull painted with Corflex, and 2 counts of epoxy(10 year type)

Stern from on shore Posted by Hello

Stern from on deck Posted by Hello

Port side Posted by Hello

Bow from on deck Posted by Hello

Wheelhouse Posted by Hello

Opening Salvo

So I'm nuts. The Wendy B is a sixty five year old tugboat that has not been in commercial service since 1945 and spent the late forties and the fifties under the St. Lawrence River. It's been own for the last twenty years by a licensed captain who pulled it out of a mudbank next to a dredging company dock, re-engined it, and lived and travelled on it. It's a lovely picturesque boat, but still mostly a steel shell. A work in progress! The sale is in progress, pending survey and insurance, but if it all comes together I will take posession in Toronto in late spring and bring it down to Washington DC as soon thereafter as practicable.

This is the begining of the boat trip and planing process

This is the first entry.